Study Abroad In Europe

 
 

  APICIUS International School of Hospitality

APICIUS International School of Hospitality

  Florence, Italy


APICIUS, reserve the right to modify certification requirements.

Free Elective study abroad programs (US credits) are available for study abroad students.
Credit transfer for all coursework is available through University of South Florida. For further information please contact us.
 
APICIUS offer full services to all enrolled students such as housing, advising, meal plans, extracurricular activities and service learning opportunities. Detailed information on these services can be found in the Housing and Student Life section on our website.
 
 

  Our programs

Semester Free Elective


This program is aimed at students wishing to design their own curriculum or students presently enrolled in a College/ University who wish to study abroad for one semester/year/summer session and transfer their credits back to their home Institution.

Students may select a maximum of 5 classes for Fall or Spring session of which one Italian Language course is required. Not all courses are available in the Free Elective Program; students must make selections only from the current schedule of classes. Internship are NOT available to Free Elective program students.

Benefits for Study Abroad Students:  

  • Flexibility: Students can select to take classes in the morning or in the afternoon and studying abroad in Florence for full semester.
  • Wide Stimulating curriculum: Each session at Apicius opens up a rich academic offering in diverse areas of study
  • Discovering Destinations: The Educational Field Trips department at Apicius offers an exciting array of trips throughout the program sessions. They are open to all enrolled students and include both Italian and European destinations such as Cinque Terre, Parma and Modena, Chianti, Munich, Sicily, Rome and the Amalfi Coast. Field Trips are optional and offered at an extra cost.
  • Getting Involved: Services and Opportunities for Students : Full access to services created for student life and development as well as extracurricular activities tailored to integrating students to Italian culture. Program participants will have the support of Apicius' Student Services department for counseling, advising, emergency issues, and all matters pertaining to student life in Florence. Furthermore, the department organizes and coordinates extracurricular activities on every night of the week such as sports nights, music activities, journalism, connecting cultures and city walks to discover artisans' laboratories and specialty products.

 

Don't Just Dream it........Do it!!!

Price: 10,400 $  Apply Now

Culinary Arts


 

The Apicius Culinary Arts Certificate Program offers students the possibility of enrolling in any of the following programs:

  1. Single semester
  2. One Year (two semester) Culinary Arts Certificate Program
  3. Two Year Associate Certificate in Culinary Arts.

 

Students take a pre-set block of courses each semester, building a solid foundation in Italian cuisine with an emphasis on the importance of Italian products, the seasonality of ingredients, and simplicity.

Students will gain a solid foundation of Italian cuisine covering all aspects of professional culinary arts with an emphasis on Italian products, traditions, and regionality. The goal of the Culinary Arts Certificate is to impart Italian taste, refinement and the origins of a cuisine with ancient and multi-cultural roots. The tenets of professional cooking in the restaurant sector are taught as the basis from which students will then learn about Italian regional cuisine, wines, and Italian baking and pastry techniques.  The second semester offers courses focusing on creative approaches to Italian cuisine and the principles of restaurant management.

Program Objectives
The program provides students with the basic skills necessary for the individual desiring to enter into the professional food services industry. It develops the students’ practical culinary skills, preparing them for a professional career in a constantly evolving industry, which encompasses a wide range of exciting fields.

Duration and Certification
Programs may be taken for one semester, one year or two years. Each year consists of two semesters that offer a set of core classes and intensive weekend seminars. Students can attend one single semester and obtain a transcript for credits, or complete the full year program and receive a Certificate in Culinary Arts.

Practicum/Internship
Upon request, continuing students who have successfully completed the first semester Italian language course, will have the opportunity to broaden their experiences through an internship of approximately 10 hours a week where they can practice skills and experience a professional environment in one of the most visited tourist cities in the world.

Semester I: Beginning (offered in Fall & Spring)

The aim of the Beginning level is to provide students with a basic comprehension of Italian cuisine, with reference to our culture and taste.  Topics studied include: regional cooking, history of Italian gastronomy and the selection of fresh ingredients. Students will be introduced to basic food preparation techniques, nutrition concepts and wine tasting. Students will be taught to study the role food plays in Italian culture and society and have the opportunity to gauge their abilities and interests, in order to understand whether they are inclined towards the professional or amateur culinary arts.

Italian Language
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
The language course is offered in different levels according to the student’s knowledge.

FW CA PC 330 Introduction to Professional Cooking
3 semester credits (90 hours: 15 lecture hours – 30 hands on class hours – 45 supervised lab hours)
This course will introduce students to the tools, techniques and essential food preparation of this industry. Special attention will be given to sanitation and hygiene. Students will also learn how to pair ingredients in the creation of various dishes.

FW CA TF 340 Tradition of Italian Food I
2 semester credits (15 lecture hours – 30 hands on class hours)
This course focuses on the preparation of dishes that distinguish traditional Italian cuisine. Students will learn how to use different ingredients to prepare representative Italian dishes. The fundamentals of cooking methods, techniques, and preparations utilized in Italian cuisine will be thoroughly covered; these concepts will prepare students continuing on to the intermediate and advanced sections of this course (II + III). Notions of the history of these dishes will also be discussed as students prepare the various recipes.

FW CA RC 360 Italian Regional Cuisine
3 semester credits (90 hours: 15 lecture hours – 30 hands on class hours – 45 supervised lab hours)
This course focuses on the different aspects of regional food in Italy. Emphasis will be placed on how food relates to the local lifestyle and culture. Regional economy and local resources will be analyzed and compared. Students will be introduced to the various local products through class demonstrations and tastings.

FW BP BI 325 Breads of Italy Specialty Breads
2 semester credits (15 lecture hours – 30 hands on class hours)
Building on previous knowledge, students learn to mix, shape, bake, store, and distribute breads and rolls. Emphasis will be placed on increased use of traditional fermentation methods, equipment, and methods that emphasize flavor, texture, and appearance as well as techniques that increase shelf life. This course offers the opportunity to learn the principles and techniques of preparing multi-grain breads, sourdoughs, holiday or seasonal breads, and flat breads. Special emphasis will be placed on Italian regional breads; handling grains (such as soakers) for specialty breads; mixing, shaping, and finishing specialty breads; and learning innovative baking methods.

FW WE WS 335 Wine Appreciation I
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
This course provides the fundamental skills and a technical introduction to wine tasting beginning with the visual, olfactory, and gustatory examination. Students will learn to analyze the organoleptic components of wines, the importance and influences attributed by to territory, and finally how to distinguish as well as create excellent food and wine pairings. Lectures will be supplemented by wine tasting workshops. The objective of this class is for students to be able to recognize quality in wines from around the world and obtain a working knowledge of international wine regions and as well as the wine industry.

Seminars

FW FS SA 300 Food Safety and Sanitation
1 semester credits (16 lecture hours)
This seminar introduces food production practices. Topics covered include prevention of food borne illness through proper handling of potentially hazardous foods, legal guidelines, kitchen safety, facility sanitation, safe practices of food preparation, storing, and reheating guidelines.

FW WC TW 300 Leading Italian Winemakers
1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
This seminars will introduce the student to the Italian wine industry with a focuses on top producers. The historical and cultural traditions of this art will be examined in depth as well as the contemporary wine industry in the age of globalization. Seminars will be held by noted Italian vintners.

FW CA SC 300 Local Restaurants and Wine Bars: Signature Chefs and Sommeliers
1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
Industry professionals come together in a series of seminars covering their personal and professional experiences as well as offering insight and advice to participating students.

FW BP GI 330 The Art of Gelato and Italian Ice
(15 hours)1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
This seminar introduces to the art of making gelato, Italian-style sorbet and Ice. Seminar includes history, nutrient composition of gelato, and how to formulate flavors, displays case techniques and decoration, and recipes.

FW DN IN 305 Introduction to Nutrition
2 semester credits (30 lecture hours)
This course introduces students to the basic nutrition concepts such as calories, nutrient density and dietary reference intake. Through the course the characteristics and the role of the basic nutrients (protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals) will be closely examined and different food combinations analyzed and discussed. The concept of food pyramid will be extensively analyzed and different food pyramids and their cultural and scientific backgrounds compared: the Mediterranean, the USDA, the traditional Latin American, the Asian a and the Vegetarian. Menu composition and meal planning will be discussed form the nutritionist’s point of view.

Semester II: Intermediate (offered in Fall & Spring)

The aim of the Intermediate level is to deepen students’ knowledge of Italian food, with special reference to high quality labeled/protected products (DOP & IGP). Special focus will be given to the use of seasonal products, herbs and spices. Students will start studying basic Italian pastry, as well as decoration techniques, and will study Italian wines by region. Restaurant planning and organization are included in the program, together with a brief study of room service. Continuing students who have successfully passed the first semester Italian language course will have the possibility to put into practice what they have learned in class through the Internship session.

FW CA TF 440 Tradition of Italian Food II
2 semester credits (15 lecture hours – 30 hands on class hours)
This course continues to explore the tradition of Italian food through representative recipes. Emphasis will be given to more elaborate dishes, including the cleaning and preparation of shellfish, fresh pasta, food combinations, feast foods and banquets.

FW CA CC 450 Professional Cooking II: Italian Creative Cuisine and Decoration
3 semester credits (90 hours: 15 lecture hours – 30 hands on class hours – 45 supervised lab hours)
Examines the new Italian cuisine. Traditional recipes will be examined to discover how new ingredients can be used to transform these dishes into the new, creative Italian cuisine. Attention will be given to food combinations; fusion of Italian cuisine with other types of cuisine and the creative process in menu planning. Emphasis will also be placed on food presentation, decoration and plating.

FW BP BP 430 Baking, Pastry and Confectionery I
2 semester credits (15 lecture hours – 30 hands on class hours)
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of baking, including the production of cakes and cookies, pastries, plated desserts and cake decorating. Also included is an introduction to the creation of confectionary items.

FW WE WA 440 Wine Appreciation II
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)This course has been designed to provide students with an advanced working knowledge of wine appreciation. Emphasis is placed on studying the most important Italian grape varieties through out the Italian territory and to learn how to assess and to evaluate the wine typologies deriving from different grapes and soils. Particular importance is given to comparative wine tasting, focusing on the different characteristics of wines coming from different regions. The course gives a complete overview of the most important Italian wine areas.

HP FB RM 390 Restaurant Management
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
This course will examine the problems of the financial structures of restaurant management, in parallel with the objectives and techniques of the individual owner. The planning and decision-making tools available to managers in an organization and comparison between single or partnership managements will be discussed. Personnel organization and food preparation plans will be covered. The course is based on a double approach, combining theory and practice: students will be introduced to the basics of restaurant management and will be given the opportunity to discuss their ideas and questions with selected professionals who are successfully running their restaurant businesses in Florence. Extensive site visits to local restaurants be organized.

PS SP CA 470 Special Project – Practicum a Local Restaurant
2 semester credits (140 hours)
Non-paid part- time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required. Some practicum take place at GANZO, the Apicius non-profit cultural association and restaurant-club.Please note: Special Projects are available ONLY to continuing students, upon request, according to Italian laws and regulations. Students who successfully pass the culinary entrance exam qualifying for intermediate level in the first semester, will be placed in Italian Language.

Seminars

FW CA KM 460 Kitchen Management and Brigade
1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
The kitchen brigade is the chain of command which divides the kitchen into areas of specialization. Knowing the evolution of the brigade and duties of each department, or parti, will help the professional cook to find his/her place in any kitchen. Terminology, roles and duties, management, supervising.

FW WC PF 335 Pairing Food and Wine
1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
The capacity to offer the best wine as a combination for chosen dishes is a very important task. The course includes an analysis of the “Combination Technique” used today by the Italian Association of Sommeliers, sensory and quality evaluations, practical workshops on the most successful matches as well as the creation of new flavor combinations.

FW BP SD 380 Special Diet Baking
1 semester credit (15 hours)
This seminar provides students with practical knowledge of ingredient substitutions for current current nutritional needs, food allergies and intolerance. Students balance formulas using alternative ingredients such as fat, dairy, wheat (gluten free) and sugar replacements currently used in baked goods.

FW CA BP 505 Sugar Artistry
1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
Students are introduced to various sugar artistry techniques, including pastillage, poured, pulled and blown sugar. Emphasis is on the planning and production of individual showpieces using various shaping and molding methods in order to garnish dishes, buffet, cakes.

HP FB SF 300 Sustainability in the Italian Food Industry
2 semester credits (30 lecture hours
Development of a sustainable food system is an essential part of long term economic planning. The course focuses on food processing, packaging and distribution, exploring the social aspect of the food supply chain. Sustainability principles will be analyzed as well as case studies in food and beverage service and retailing.

Two-Year Associate Certificate Program

This program  is open to students who have completed the Culinary Arts or Baking and Pastry Certificate programs and wish to deepen their theoretic and practical knowledge in the Culinary Arts.

Semester III -Advanced Level  I (offered in FALL )

FW CA BP 501 Baking, Pastry & Confectionery II
2 credits (15 lecture hours + 30 lab hours)
The course introduces advanced students to the high quality products that characterize Italian pastry and baking including the production of special breads, mignardises, chocolate confections and meringue. After a survey of the use of basic doughs used in bakeries such as pan di spagna, dacquoise and short crust pastry, the course will introduce students to special breads baking, sugar working and confection preparations. Through the preparation of marzapane, pasticceria mignon, savarin and baba’, the students will explore and interpret creatively the most important examples of the traditional Italian pastry and confectionery, including the use of typical liquors. The preparation of special breads, meringues, semifreddi, bavaresi, and confections with hard, soft and liquid centers will challenge students to develop and master professional skills in pastry, bakery, confectionery and cake decoration.

FW CA TF 503 Tradition Of Italian Food III: The Evolution of Italian
2 credits (15 lecture hours + 30 lab hours)
A survey of the major contemporary Italian chefs and their cooking philosophy. Students will learn how to read and compose a menu, and the major elements that distinguish high-level Italian cooking through the original recipes of Gianfranco Vissani, Gualtiero Marchesi, Nadia Santini and many others. This course is meant to help students understand the current Italian culinary trends as a continuous evolution of the different regional cooking traditions, while keeping in mind the importance of a healthy diet combined with the individual chef’s creativity.

FW CA CC 502 Italian Creative Cuisine and Decoration II
2 credits (15 lecture hours + 30 lab hours)
This course is intended for advanced students with a sound knowledge of Italian traditional ingredients and regional cooking. The course will further develop advanced student skills in recipe elaboration, plate presentation and decoration. The course will show students how to build and develop innovative combination’s of ingredients on the legacy of Italian tradition. Each class, introduced by a short lecture, will focus on planning creative menus and on creating decorative dishes, from starters to fresh pasta, from vegetable soups to cakes, including shellfish and typical cheeses. Restaurant simulations are scheduled as an integral part of the course.

FW FM FS 350 Principles of Food
3 credits (45 lecture hours)
The aim of this course is to present to students the different food groups and their nutritive characteristics. The most relevant staples, including milk and dairy products, eggs, grains and legumes, fruits and vegetables, meat and fish, will be analized, including discussion on their role in civilization and human history. Their transformation and interaction during the different cooking processes will be examined with particular emphasis on the chemical, microbial and physical processes which affect food quality and determines the transformation during the process that brings it from the producer to the consumer. Emphasis will also be placed on production standards, food safety and sanitation.

FW CA VC 504 Cooking Light
2 credits (15 lecture hours + 30 lab hours)
In the old days when rich sauces ruled and vegetables were but a garnish, chefs were not experts on low fat food. But times have changed. Over the past 20 years, in response to customer demands, many top chefs have become masters at cooking with less fat. The course will first examine contemporary perspectives on the traditional diets of the Mediterranean region, as well as the basic nutrition concepts and the role of basic nutrients (protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals). The concept of food pyramid will be extensively analyzed and different food pyramids and their backgrounds compared. Low fat gourmet recipes and menus will be extensively discussed and experienced.

FW CA IN 550 Culinary Internship/Apprenticeship
Internship at GANZO, the Apicius non-profit cultural association and restaurant/club

Semester IV – Advanced Level II (Offered in SPRING)

FW CA WC 506 Worldwide Cuisine
2 credits (15 lecture hours + 30 lab hours)
This course is meant to teach students the role of cultural heritage in food preparation techniques and regional dishes. Students will experience gourmet food preparation from several foreign cuisines such as French, Asian, Spanish, Greek and, of course, Italian. Ethnic customs and heritage will be considered in relationship to global cuisine; effects of spices, herbs and condiments to economy meal preparation and culture will be considered.

FW CA NC 505 Nutritional Cooking
2 credits (15 lecture hours + 30 lab hours)
Principles of planning, preparation and presentation of wholesome, nutritionally balanced meals. The course emphasizes designing meals on a seasonal basis following the principles of healthy cooking.

FW FS FS 508 Introduction to Food Science
3 credits (45 lecture hours)
This course introduces the principles of food production and consumption, food in history, society, economics and politics, development of food industry; nutritional, physiological and psychological roles of food; and quality food products. Topical issues include: food additives, environmental impact of food processing, food marketing and education.

FW FS TF 507 Psychology of Taste & Flavor
3 credits (45 lecture hours)
This is an introductory course in Food Science that explores and examines the physiology of how we taste and flavor food. From the simplicity of identifying “sour versus bitter” to the complexity of pairing food and wine, the objective of this course is to train taste buds to better understand flavors that are not generally accepted but require a deeper understanding before being appreciated.

FW WC PF 335 Pairing Italian Food & Wine

FW CA IN 600 Culinary Internship/Apprenticeship
Internship at GANZO, the Apicius non-profit cultural association and restaurant/club

Internship Sessions: After completion of the 2 year program, or after having successfully completed the Advanced Levels (2 semesters), students may wish to continue their experience abroad with a 15 week non-paid internship program. Students MUST sign up for an Internship Session at the time of application and will not be accepted into Internship Sessions after arrival in Florence. 

Price: 9,950 $  Apply Now

Hospitality Management


 

Students wishing to study Hospitality Management have the following options:

  1. Single Semester or One year Certificate Program
  2. Two Year Associate Certificate
  3. Four Year Certificate in Hospitality Management & Tourism.

ONE YEAR HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE

Program Overview
The Apicius Professional Program in Hospitality Management offers international students a unique opportunity to specialize their studies in the field of hospitality, while studying in one of tourism’s most challenging and exciting cities in the world. The program is based not only on theory but also on practical experience consisting of site visits, guest lectures and internships organized to provide formative professional experiences for the students. The program is based in the heart of this unique and sophisticated city and is renowned for its expertise in teaching methods, ensuring a remarkable experience for each A.I.S.H. Hospitality student. Students enrolled in this program will take a  pre-set block of courses.

Program Objectives
The focus of the program is to develop the skills necessary to operate in the international hospitality sector. Students will be immersed in the theoretical and practical teachings of hospitality and tourism, from the internal procedures of hotels, restaurants, wine bars, special events and more to the financial practices and technological innovations that continually shape internationally hospitality today.

Duration and Certification
Certificate programs may be taken for one semester, one year or two years. Each year consists of two semesters that offer a set of core classes and intensive weekend seminars. Students can attend one single semester and receive a transcript for credits, or complete the full year program and receive a Certificate in Hospitality Management.

Two-year and a full four-year associate certificate programs are available for seriously motivated students who wish to enter the professional field upon completion of studies.

Practicum/Internship
Each semester students will have the opportunity to broaden their experience through an internship, dedicating approximately 10 hours a week and allowing students to practice and experience a professional environment in one of the most visited tourist cities in the world.

Semester I: Beginning (Fall)

Mission/Goal
The aim of the Beginning Level is to provide students with an overview of the Tourism and the Hospitality Industry. Students will be introduced to the organization and management of hotels and will study the practices of human resources management as well as accounting procedures and financial statements. Special emphasis will be placed on supervision and leadership, customer relations management, and the important role customer-client relations have in HR management.

Italian Language
3 semester credits
(45 lecture hours)
The language course is offered in different levels according to the student’s knowledge.

HP HT IH 300 Introduction to Hospitality
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
Provides a fundamental overview of the hospitality industry and its main segments: hotel, restaurant, management services, and clubs. The operational sectors of the industry as well as managerial components and skills will be explored. All of the following topics will be examined: development of tourism; demand for travel, examination of food and beverages industry, associations and organizations related to hospitality as a sub-segment of the tourism industry. Career opportunities in the hospitality industry will be discussed and students will be encouraged to develop their own career plan.

HP HT SL 340 Supervision and Leadership in the Hospitality Industry
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
Examines the roles and responsibilities of supervisors and managers in the hospitality industry. The course will also focus on developing communication strategies, motivational techniques, performance evaluation and review, staffing, training and strategic planning. Attention will be given to conflict resolution techniques as well as methods for recruiting, interviewing and hiring staff. Budget management will also be covered.

BU MA HR 350 Human Resource Management
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of human resources management, with particular emphasis in human resource planning and strategy, personnel selection, equal employment opportunity, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and contemporary issues. The course has been developed for the those whose job requires managing people in a global environment according to the traditional HR. Topics covered include: human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, personnel selection, performance, employee turnover, the importance of HR in an industry like the hospitality sector, ethics and practices within personnel, legal issues, and how diversity impacts the workforce.

FW FC FC 340 Food, Culture and Society In Italy
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture.  The main focus consists of what is generally defined as “made in Italy” culture and style in post-war Italy. Also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.

HP FB SM 330/331 Service Management
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours + 140 hours practicum)
Balanced between theoretical and applied learning, students will explore the function of service systems within the restaurant environment. All the various front of the house positions and the theory and techniques of customer service will be analyzed practiced and evaluated. The course includes styles of service for different types of restaurants and cultural variations in service styles to illustrate the complexities of guest satisfaction. A combination of interpersonal, leadership, and group dynamics will be explored.Certificate Students enrolled in Service Management will be able to manage the operation of a full-service dining room and front of the house procedures practiced. Students will concentrate on dining room service, table set-ups, point-of-sale system and will focus on the operation of a full-service restaurant.

Seminars

FW FS SA 300 Food Safety and Sanitation
1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
This course introduces food production practices. Topics covered include prevention of food borne illness through proper handling of potentially hazardous foods, legal guidelines, kitchen safety, facility sanitation, safe practices of food preparation, storing, and reheating guidelines.

FW CA SC 300 Local Restaurants and Wine Bars:Signature Chefs and Sommeliers
1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
Industry professionals come together in a series of seminars covering their personal and professional experiences as well as offering insight and advice to participating students.

FW WC IW 300Leading Italian Winemakers
1 semester credits (15 lecture hours)
This course will introduce the student to the Italian wine industry with a focuses on top producers. The historical and cultural traditions of this art will be examined in depth as well as the contemporary wine industry in the age of globalization. Seminars will be held by noted Italian vintners.

FW BP GI 330 The Art of Gelato and Italian Ice
1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
This seminar introduces to the art of making gelato, Italian-style sorbet and Ice. Seminar includes history, nutrient composition of gelato, and how to formulate flavors, displays case techniques and decoration, and recipes.

HP HT ST 325 Sustainable Tourism
2 semester credits (30 lecture hours)
This course examines the economic, environment and social impact of tourism and provides an understanding of tourism as part of sustainable development in the Italian and global context. The course  analyzes how local cultures  can better absorb short and long-term tourism, study the benefits of eco-tourism on natural habitats and landscapes, and how a more sustainable approach to tourism affects the social fabric of host peoples, communities, customs and lifestyles. The course will include field trips to various locations in Italy where sustainable tourism policies are in place or are being discussed.

Semester II: Intermediate (Spring)

Mission/Goal
The aim of the Advanced level is to deepen students’ understanding of hospitality management procedures, with a focus on front office, price management, purchasing.

The program includes an introduction to the newest form of hotel marketing and special event management. Special emphasis will be placed specific sectors of tourism and hospitality such as restaurant, hotel, and special event management.

HP HT TC 360 The Client – Customer Relation Management
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
This course is an examination of personal and small group communication with particular emphasis on methods of perceiving information and transmitting messages in order to reassure and fidelize the Customer. We will also study the importance of “Role Playing” by the staff in the Hospitality Business to develop Customer fidelity. A review of the ways in which people communicate with each other and an introduction to the skill needed to communicate effectively in work situations. An analysis of the two basic principles of the Quality System: “Quality is a Bottom-Up Model” and “Do what you have to do correctly the first time”. Students also learn about decision-making in groups and forces that influence group behavior.

HP HT HM 350 Hospitality Marketing
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
Takes a practical approach to introducing students to the marketing of hotels, restaurants and clubs. Market segmentation, marketing research, advertising, public relations, promotions, packaging, pricing strategies, revenue maximization, travel purchasing systems and the future of hospitality marketing will be examined.

HP FB RM 390 Restaurant Management
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
This course will examine the problems of the financial structures of restaurant management, in parallel with the objectives and techniques of the individual owner. The planning and decision-making tools available to managers in an organization and comparison between single or partnership managements will be discussed. Personnel organization and food preparation plans will be covered. The course is based on a double approach, combining theory and practice: students will be introduced to the basics of restaurant management and will be given the opportunity to discuss their ideas and questions with selected professionals who are successfully running their restaurant businesses in Florence. Extensive site visits to local restaurants be organized.

HP HT HA 400 Hospitality Accounting
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
The course introduces hospitality accounting concepts and procedures. After an overview of basic accounting, the following issues are covered: income statement, balance sheet, cash flow, cost management, break-even models, pricing, budgeting, cash management and investment decisions. Emphasis is given to the processing of hospitality financial data and the flow of financial information, which results in the production of financial statements. The course makes no attempt to cover the detailed concepts and mechanics of financial accounting or the detailed procedures of bookkeeping. The content is specifically designed for students attending courses related to managerial aspects of the hospitality industry.

FW WE WW 360 Wines of The World I
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
This course has been designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the main wine producing countries of the so-called “Old World” and to further develop skills as a wine taster. The countries to be studied are: France (with a special emphasis on Bordeaux, Burgundy and the Champagne), as well as Germany, Austria, Spain and Portugal. Through comparative tastings, students will be encouraged to offer a critical analysis of wines produced in different parts of the Old World, with emphasis on the relationship between sensory properties of the wines and factors associated with their place of origin.

PS SP RM 391 Special Project: Restaurant Management Practicum
2 semester credit (140 contact hours)
Non-paid part- time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required. Practicum takes place at GANZO, the Apicius non-profit cultural association and restaurant-club.

Seminars

FW CA KM 460 Kitchen Management and Brigade
1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
The kitchen brigade is the chain of command which divides the kitchen into areas of specialization. Knowing the evolution of the brigade and duties of each department, or parti, will help the professional cook to find his/her place in any kitchen. Terminology, roles and duties, management, supervising.

FW WC PF 335 Pairing Food and Wines
1 semester credit (15 hours)
The capacity to offer the best wine as a combination for chosen dishes is a very important task. The course includes an analysis of the “Combination Technique” used today by the Italian Association of Sommeliers, sensory and quality evaluations, practical workshops on the most successful matches as well as the creation of new flavor combinations.

HP FB MS 370 Food and Wine Marketing Strategies
1 semester credit (15 hours)
This course gives students the fundamentals of marketing beyond the conventions of advertising and promotion. Concepts and practices in marketing food and wine will be deeply analyzed in order to give students the technical skills to formulate their own marketing campaign. In the second part of the term, students will be working on individual and group assignments in order to plan and organize a marketing strategy for a new product or market re-positioning. This course closely follows current events and trends to illustrate contemporary marketing techniques.

HP FB WB 540 Wine Bar Management
1 semester credit (15 hours)
The course objective is to introduce students to the basics of wine and bar management. We will study the logical progression from the concept of operating a wine bar to a comprehensive picture of what the wine bar business is all about. The course will focus on wine bar financing, staff management, analysis and marketing. Students will learn strategies and tricks to effectively market and promote their business and create more customers without resorting to the traditional means of expensive and often ineffective mass media advertising.

HP FB SF 300 Sustainability in the Italian Food Industry
2 semester credits (30 hours)
Development of a sustainable food system is an essential part of long term economic planning. The course focuses on food processing, packaging and distribution, exploring the social aspect of the food supply chain. Sustainability principles will be analyzed as well as case studies in food and beverage service and retailing.

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YEAR TWO ASSOCIATE CERTIFICATE HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
The two-year associate certificate in Hospitality Management is open to all students who have completed any of the one-year certificate programs. The program covers all aspects of the hospitality industry from management, tourism and housekeeping to accounting and finances. Special emphasis is given to the food and wine sectors of hospitality as well as the social and cultural aspects of the hospitality industry in Italy.

Semester I: Advanced (Fall)

HP HT IM 450 International Management for the Hospitality Industry
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
This management course offers an emphasis in the hospitality industry for students interested in international business ventures and partnerships in this specific sector. Management, leadership, human resource management, organizational skills and strategy will all be analyzed from a cross-cultural business perspective. The class will focus on strategies adapting managerial skills across cultures. Guest lecturers and on-site visits to international hospitality structures in the city of Florence are incorporated into the lesson schedule.

HP HT SE 410 Special Event Management
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
This course will examine all aspects of special event management. Design, financing, budgeting, leadership and integrated marketing will be studied. The course will also provide students with the necessary background for improving their effectiveness and profitability when managing special events, which demands competence in the areas of drafting contracts for events, marketing and sales, event logistics and preparations, staffing, and accounting.

HP FB CS 470 Catering Sales and Operations
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
The course will enable candidates to gain a deep knowledge and qualification relating directly to the catering environment. The course will enhance their personal growth and development, enabling them to undertake their role with greater confidence. All organizational, logistic and marketing aspects of the catering industry will be analyzed.

HP HT OB 470 Organizational Behavior in the Hospitality Industry
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
The course is designed to assist students in making sound decisions in the hospitality industry by heightening their sensibility to the organizational parameters that influence their decisions. Furthermore students will analyze computer systems and their applications within the hotel industry. All computer applications are examined, from reservations to the back office through a series of assignments and projects.

CP MC PP 480 Public Relations Strategies
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
This course introduces the student to the strategic roles and functions of the Public Relations (PR) practitioner and enables them to evaluate the context in which PR is practiced, to understand the potential and practice of PR as a management function, and to analyze critically the structure of PR management, its role and techniques. In addition, the student will be introduced to the rhetorical arguments that impact upon PR activities and will be made aware of the importance of professionalism and ethics in public relations practice.

HP FB CC 532 Cost Control
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
Course develops skills in scheduling and controlling costs in managed projects that present the challenges of time, human resources, materials, budget, project specifications, and deadlines. The concept of financial planning for businesses and organizations, including a special emphasis on hospitality structures, asks students to consider the compilation of budgets, identifying/forecasting potential problems to avoid profit loss, flexible vs. static budgets to control costs, and types of cost control analysis.

PS IN EM 411 Internship in Event Management
2 semester credits (140 Contact hours)
Students will be planning events for the special section of the GANZO restaurant-club that comprises special events during weekends upon reservation. The quality of the experience, the final portfolio and the faculty supervision will guarantee a unique educational experience.

Seminars

FT FC GS 270 Glamour and Style: the Pitti Fashion Shows
1 semester credits (15 lecture hours)
Prior to the postwar period Italian fashion and design was limited to tailors and seamstresses. That all changed with Pitti Imagine and the boom of the 1950’s. Pitti Immagine organizes some of the world’s most important fashion events: international quality clothing and textile fairs, communication happenings and cultural and research initiatives for the fashion system and fashion as the aesthetic expression and global evolution of taste. This course will analyze the evolution of the Pitti Fashion events from its origin throughout decades of imposing Italian fashion.

HP FB FP 360 Food Purchasing
1 semester credits (15 lecture hours)
The objective of this course is to train students interested in food service careers to operate with the basic principles of procuring food in hospitality structures. Analyzed concepts include targeting needs, purchasing, receiving, efficient equipment and storage systems, and food safety/sanitation. Students will develop an insight of the collaborative relationship between purchasers and chefs for menu planning, calculate food volumes and costs, and how to ensure the safe passage from food items from the moment it’s prepared to the final presentation on the client’s plate.

HP HT WH 380 UNESCO World Heritage Site, Florence: Moving Towards Sustainable Tourism
2 semester credits (30 lecture hours)
This course, starting with a historical description of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), will focus on the “ World Heritage” concept and how to become a part of it, explaining the different heritage categories such as Cultural and Natural, Tangible and Intangible. Florence is studied as a model of a city on the world heritage list. Through encounters with institutional officers, policies and programs requested to keep the city of Florence on the world heritage list are analyzed.

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FOUR YEAR CERTIFICATE IN HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT AND TOURISM

Upon completion of the 2-year Culinary Arts or Hospitality Management associate certificate, continuing students may complete a four-year program dedicated to producing professional leaders for the international hospitality sector.
The program combines a conceptual and theoretical study of subject matters in the classroom with practical experience in order to develop the skills and knowledge needed for a future in the hospitality and tourism industry.

The internship program is an integral part of the four-year study that enriches the students’ experience by enhancing cultural awareness as well as complimenting the classroom studies with real-world experience. Apicius has ongoing partnerships with industry professionals in and around the city of Florence in businesses such as hotels, wineries, wine bars, restaurants, and clubs where students will practice the concepts learned in the classroom. The internship practices and curriculum content are monitored by an Academic Board which includes the Academic Administration, supervising staff and coordinators who work directly with the students, and industry executives.

Admission and Requirements:
Any student who has completed two years of college (60 semester credits) may apply for admission to the four-year certificate. Full credit will be granted for Associate in Culinary Arts and Hospitality degrees. All students, upon entering the program, must meet the institution’s core curriculum requirements in order to receive the certificate. The curriculum will build upon prior knowledge accumulated in previous associate degrees, focusing specifically on a professional instruction of Hospitality and Tourism Management. A maximum of 60 lower division credits may be transferred from a junior or community college program. Students must complete an internship, 1000 hours of training experience in a hospitality or tourism sector.

Hospitality and Tourism Management 4-year Program of Study (minimum 60 credits)

Core Course Requirements (36 credits)

BU EC ME 280 Micro-Economics
45 lecture hours 3 semester credits)

BU EC MA 300 Macro-Economics
(45 lecture hours 3 semester credits)

HP HT IN 320 International Tourism
(45 lecture hours 3 semester credits)

HP HT GF 330 Greenmapping Florence
(45 lecture hours 3 semester credits)

BU ER BS 350 Business Sustainability
(45 lecture hours 3 semester credits)

BU MA CB 335 Consumer Behavior
(45 lecture hours 3 semester credits)

HP HT CT 450 Corporate Travel
(45 lecture hours 3 semester credits)

BU MK SM 330 International Marketing
(45 lecture hours 3 semester credits)

BU ER SC 330 Entrepreneurship in the Social Context
(45 lecture hours 3 semester credits)

LA CW CR 230 Critical Writing
(45 lecture hours 3 semester credits)

CP MC CT 330 Critical Thinking
45 lecture hours 3 semester credits

Elective Course Requirements (12 credits)

Students must complete 4 courses for a total of 12 credits from any of the departments in the School of Hospitality and School of Business. Course offerings will vary according to the semester schedule.

Internship / Externship Program Requirements (12 credits)

Internship in the Hospitality Industry. Students will complete 1000 internship hours for a total of 12 credits. The hours are divided into 4 semesters (or 4 internship courses worth 3 credits each). Please note: Internships are available ONLY to continuing students, upon request, according to Italian laws and regulations.

Price: 9,950 $  Apply Now

Italian Baking & Pastry


Program Objectives:

The goal of the program is to provide students with a comprehensive overview of Italian Culture while providing them with the techniques and skills to fully prepare them to become professional bakers and pastry chefs. 
Students develop skills in all areas including: breads, desserts, cake decoration, and buffet centerpieces. The program focuses on both production and individualized skills necessary to find gainful employment in bakeries, restaurants, and other catering settings. The program also offers Safety and Sanitation, Nutrition Science, and pracitcal experience to support and develop students’ professional skills.
 
Duration and Certification:
Certificate Program may be taken for one semester or one year. The one –year program consists of two semesters, each offering a set of core classes and intensive weekend seminars. Students can attend one single semester and obtain a transcript for credits, or complete the full year program and receive a Certificate in Baking and Pastry. Upon completion of the Baking and Pastry Certificate, students may continue their studies in the second year of the Culinary Arts Certificate.
 
Practicum/Internship:
Upon request, continuing students who have successfully completed the first semester Italian language course, will have the opportunity to broaden their experiences through an internship of approximately 10 hours a week where they can practice skills and experience a professional environment in one of the most visited cities in the world.
 
 
SEMESTER I – BEGINNING (SPRING or FALL)
 
Mission/Goal
The aim of the Beginning level is to provide students with a basic comprehension of Italian pastry. Students will be introduced to the characteristics and functions of baking ingredients and will be able to prepare simple cakes and pastries. Italian regional breads and cakes will be studied, in order to give students a comprehension of local gastronomic traditions and use of ingredients. 
All students enrolled in Certificate Programs are required to take a three week course of Italian Language before the start of the Certificate Program. The Italian language class is fundamental to understand the original terms that will be used during lessons (i.e. names of regions, recipes, etc.) and to acquire the minimum conversation skills required for participating in the second semester Internship.
 
CORE COURSES
 
Italian Language 

3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) 
The language course is offered in different levels according to the student’s knowledge.
 
FW BP BC 310  Italian Classical Cakes and Tarts
3 semester credits (90 hours: 15 lecture hours - 30 hands on class hours – 45 supervised lab hours)
Students will study the history and background of various national and regional cakes and tarts. The course will cover the origin of classical cakes, variations from classical methods, and customer-driven deviations from traditional preparations. Students will study a variety of doughs, batters, fillings, and glazes, with an emphasis on a thorough understanding of the techniques and proper skill execution for Italian cakes. Special attention will be paid to advanced creaming methods (separated creaming methods, creaming without leavening agents) and combination methods. Piping skills are practiced.    
 
FW BP BT 320 Baking Techniques
2 semester credits (15 lecture hours - 30 hands on class hours) 
Baking Techniques introduces the functions of baking ingredients (such as yeast, flour, and shortening), mixing methods for doughs, fermentation techniques, heat transfer methods. Focus on basic elements such as pastry dough, sponge cake, pâté a choux, puff pastry, plunder, danesi, croissant, egg/butter based basic creams, production and conservation of fruit conserves and meringues. In this course, students taste and test the products they create as well as complete a research assignment.     
 
FW BP BI 325  Breads of Italy and Specialty Breads
2 semester credits (15 lecture hours - 30 hands on class hours)
Building on previous knowledge, students learn to mix, shape, bake, store, and distribute breads and rolls. Emphasis will be placed on increased use of traditional fermentation methods, equipment, and methods that emphasize flavor, texture, and appearance as well as techniques that increase shelf life. This course offers the opportunity to learn the principles and techniques of preparing multi-grain breads, sourdoughs, holiday or seasonal breads, and flat breads. Special emphasis will be placed on Italian regional breads; handling grains (such as soakers) for specialty breads; mixing, shaping, and finishing specialty breads; and learning innovative baking methods. 
 
FW BP PS 350 Pastry Shop 
3 semester credits (90 hours: 15 lecture hours - 30 hands on class hours – 45 supervised lab hours)
A study of classical desserts, French, Italian and international pastries, hot and cold desserts. Emphasis on advanced techniques, as well as the safe and sanitary handling of equipment and food supplies. Emphasis will be placed on the production of high quality, handcrafted desserts for retail, commercial and food service bakeries.
 
FW BP CC 360  Cookies and Petit Fours
2 semester credits (15 lecture hours - 30 hands on class hours)
This course provides students with a fundamental working knowledge of the traditional methods of producing cookies and petit fours. The course will explore the preparation and design of unfilled and filled cookies and mignardises. Topics covered include the creaming method, depositing cookies (sliced, dropped, spritz, rolled, and bar), as well as methods of mixing, shaping, baking, filling, finishing, storing, packaging, pricing, and distributing cookies. 
 
SEMINARS
 
FW FS SA 300 Food Safety and Sanitation
1 semester credits (16 lecture hours)
This course introduces food production practices. Topics covered include prevention of food borne illness through proper handling of potentially hazardous foods, legal guidelines, kitchen safety, facility sanitation, safe practices of food preparation, storing, and reheating guidelines. 
 
This course is also offered as a seminar for 1 credit – 15 lecture hours. The regular semester class will introduce the student to the subject and focus on the area of study, while the seminar will focus on the specialized area of study.
 
FW CA SC 300 Local Restaurants and Wine Bars: 
Signature Chefs and Sommeliers
1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
Industry professionals come together in a series of seminars covering their personal and professional experiences as well as offering insight and advice to participating students.
 
FW BP GI 330 The Art of Gelato and Italian Ice
1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
This seminar introduces to the art of making gelato, Italian-style sorbet and Ice. Seminar includes history, nutrient composition of gelato, and how to formulate flavors, displays case techniques and decoration, and recipes.
 
FW FC CD 314 Fact and Fiction of Regional Folklore: Celebrating Desserts
1 semester credits (15 lecture hours) 
This survey and workshop course examines the Italian peninsula through regional desserts. Italian desserts, like its cuisine, vary from region to region and often play a central role in historic festivities, regional fairs and festivals, religious celebrations, etc, such as the fried cenci fritters during Carnevale or panettone and pandoro during the Christmas and New Year season. The lessons will conduct the student through a 'sweet journey' through Italy by focusing on specific desserts and their historical and folkloristic contexts. The workshop portion of this course will offer hands practice in the preparation and presentation of regional desserts. 
 
FW DN IN 305 Introduction to Nutrition 
2 semester credits (30 lecture hours)
This course introduces students to the basic nutrition concepts such as calories, nutrient density and dietary reference intake. Through the course the characteristics and the role of the basic nutrients (protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals) will be closely examined and different food combinations analyzed and discussed. The concept of food pyramid will be extensively analyzed and different food pyramids and their cultural and scientific backgrounds compared: the Mediterranean, the USDA, the traditional Latin American, the Asian a and the Vegetarian. Menu composition and meal planning will be discussed form the nutritionist's point of view.
 
This course is also offered as a special seminar for 2 credits (30 hours). The regular semester class will introduce the student to the subject and focus on the area of study, while the seminar will focus on the specialized area of study.
 
 
SEMESTER II – ADVANCED (SPRING or SUMMER)
 
Mission/Goal
The aim of the Advanced level is to deepen students’ knowledge of Italian pastry, both regarding baking techniques, study of ingredients and the evolution and interpretation of traditional recipes in contemporary cuisine. Students will learn how to develop new ideas and products through market analysis and the use of both classical recipes and original combinations of ingredients, through the application of new production techniques. They will be able to interpret ingredients and create their own style. Special emphasis will be placed on dessert decoration techniques, sugar works, chocolate and confectionery. The program includes the study of station organization for the production dessert in restaurants and of professional skills for the presentation of dishes. 
Students who have successfully passed the Italian language course will have the opportunity to put into practice what they have learned in class through the Internship session. **See Note for Internship.
 
CORE COURSES
 
FW BP IC 440 Italian Confectionary Art
2 semester credits (15 lecture hours - 30 hands on class hours)
This course introduces students to classically applied mediums used in display work and decoration. Students will learn to execute specific designs in pastillage, rolled fondant, gum paste, and royal icing, as well as with poured, pulled, and blown sugar. Production, storing of all types of candied fruits and Italian mostarda. Production and storing of jams and conserves, fruit jellies, Italian croccante, sugar fondant, almond paste.
 
FW BP CA 450 Chocolate Artistry
2 semester credits (15 lecture hours - 30 hands on class hours)
This course introduces the principles involved in tempering chocolate, creating chocolate sculptures, forming simple centerpieces, and preparing chocolates and other confections with soft, hard, and liquid centers. Students learn to use traditional and contemporary production methods in creating confections both by hand and with special equipment. Efficient methods to increase productivity in this highly specialized field will be highlighted. 
 
 
FW BP PT 470  Baking Techniques II: Italian Pastry Techniques
2 semester credits (15 lecture hours - 30 hands on class hours)
This course introduces non-yeast, laminated doughs and the preparation of pastry products using a variety of methods-lamination, blending, creaming, foaming, and thickening. Students will combine these methods in new products, to create savory items and frozen desserts, and to use basic finishing methods by applying glazes, filling pastries, creating simple sauces, and presenting products for service. The fundamentals of heat transfer as applied to pastries in the preparation of creams, custards, soufflés, butter creams, meringues, and flavored whipped creams will also be studied. Students will taste and test the products created and will complete a research assignment. 
 
 
FW BP DS 480  Dessert Styling
2 semester credits (15 lecture hours - 30 hands on class hours)
Baking and dessert presentation, including sugar and chocolate decorations, creative use of sauces, pâté au choux, meringue, toppings and decorations, application of different icings, fruit garnishing. By the end of the course students will be able to execute the most common decorating and styling techniques and to develop their own personal plating style.
 
FW BP RD 490 Restaurant and Production Desserts
3 semester credits (90 hours: 15 lecture hours - 30 hands on class hours – 45 supervised lab hours)
This course covers the preparation and service of hot and cold desserts with a focus on individual desserts and the components involved in preparation. Students will learn and improve station organization, timing, and service coordination for restaurant dessert production. Products made will include fried products, tarts, soufflés, creams, frozen desserts. Both individual plated desserts, and desserts for banquets will be prepared. Students will develop a dessert menu from the perspective of variety, costs, practicality, and how well it matches the rest of the menu.     
 
PS SP BP 550  Special Project in the Baking and Pastry Industry 
2 semester credits (140 Internship hours)
Non-paid part- time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.
Cross-listed to: Baking and Pastry (Food and Wine Studies)
The Special Project will be activated only upon PRIOR request. It is available only to continuing students. Students who successfully pass the entrance exam qualifying for intermediate level in the first semester, will be placed in Italian Language.
 
Italian language 
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) 
The course consists of grammar lectures and conversation, and is offered in different levels according to the student’s knowledge.
 
 
SEMINARS
 
FW CA KM 460 Kitchen Management and Brigade
1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
The kitchen brigade is the chain of command which divides the kitchen into areas of specialization. Knowing the evolution of the brigade and duties of each department, or parti, will help the professional cook to find his/her place in any kitchen. Terminology, roles and duties, management, supervising.
                    
FW BP SD 380 Special Diet Baking
1 semester credit (15 hours)
This seminar provides students with practical knowledge of ingredient substitutions for current current nutritional needs, food allergies and intolerance. Students balance formulas using alternative ingredients such as fat, dairy, wheat (gluten free) and sugar replacements currently used in baked goods.
 
FW BP SA 505 Sugar Artistry
1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
Students are introduced to various sugar artistry techniques, including pastillage, poured, pulled and blown sugar. Emphasis is on the planning and production of individual showpieces using various shaping and molding methods in order to garnish dishes, buffet, cakes.
 
FW BP IW 510 Italian Wedding and Specialty Cakes
1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
This seminar is comprised of lecture, demonstration and hands-on activities. Students will learn the history of wedding cakes and the various techniques needed to create wedding and specialty cakes. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in making various decorative ornaments out of chocolate, marzipan. 
 
HP FB SF 300 Sustainability in the Italian Food Industry
2 semester credits (30 lecture hours)
Development of a sustainable food system is an essential part of long term economic planning. The course focuses on food processing, packaging and distribution, exploring the social aspect of the food supply chain. Sustainability principles will be analyzed as well as case studies in food and beverage service and retailing.

Gallery


Traditional Italian desserts
Price: 9,950 $  Apply Now

Wine Studies & Enology


Program objectives:

The program provides the basic skills necessary for the individual aspiring to enter into the wine industry. It develops the students’ awareness and skill sets to their optimum potential and prepares them for a professional career in a continuously developing industry, which encompasses a wide range of exciting fields.
The certificate program is structured in two semesters: during the first, students will learn about the production of wine and spirits, how to taste wine and recognize typical characteristics and flaws, the principles of proper wine service and the art of pairing wine and food. During the second semester, students will have intensive sessions putting theory into practice. Special attention will be given to the world’s major wine regions as well as proper wine service and salesmanship. Exams must be passed upon the completion of each semester. 
 
Duration and Certification:
Certificate Programs may be taken for one semester, one year or two years. Each year consists of two semesters that offer a set of core classes and intensive weekend seminars. Students can attend one single semester and obtain a transcript for credits, or complete the full year program and receive a Certificate in Wine Studies and Enology. 
 
Internship and visits:
Each semester an itinerant course includes visits to six different wineries.
The Fall program includes a one week hands-on grape harvesting workshop. Students will be learning directly from wine procedures through a series of trips. 
Each semester students will have the opportunity to broaden their experience through an internship of approximately 10 hours a week where they can practice and verify the acquired skills in a professional environment.
 
 
SEMESTER I – BEGINNING (FALL)
 
Mission/Goal
The aim of the Beginning level is to provide students with a basic comprehension of wine appreciation. Students will be introduced to the Italian wine classification system and to basic wine making procedures. They will learn how to organize a cellar and to serve wine. The main Italian and international wine grapes will be analyzed, as well as a selection of Italian and French wines, with a focus on the Tuscan region. Special emphasis will be placed on extensive wine tasting, in order to develop the students’ ability to understand the characteristics and qualities of wine. One of the courses includes visits to six different wineries.
All students enrolled in certificate programs are required to take a three-week course of Italian Language before the start of the program. The Italian language class is necessary to acquire the minimum conversation skills required for attending the Internship.
 
 
CORE COURSES
 
Italian Language 
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) 
The language course is offered in different levels according to the student’s knowledge.
 
 
FW WC TW 262 Tuscany and Its Wines    
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
The course will introduce students to the outstanding richness of Tuscan wine typologies focusing particularly on a presentation of the most important winegrowing areas in Tuscany. A general introduction to wine appreciation will be offered and a selection of Tuscan wines will be studied in terms of their characteristics. 
 
FW WE RG 305 Table and Wine Grapes of Italy: an Educational Wine Tour I
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours - 45 field trip hours)
The structure of this class is unique: students will be learning the regional cultural practices through a series of field trips. Students will learn all of the different methods of planting, training, pruning, irrigation, frost protection and harvesting directly from the wine producers. During the Fall Semester students will take part in the grape harvesting and assist at a vineyard for a week. The itinerant course includes visits to: Querciabella (Tuscany - Chianti,Super Tuscans), Marchesi Frescobaldi at Castello di Nipozzano (Tuscany - Chianti Rufina), Rocca Bernarda (Friuli Venezia Giulia - biodynamic wines), Tenuta La Novella (Tuscany - Chianti Classico), and Torre Fornello (Lombardia - sparkling wines). 
 
FW WE WA 340 Wine Appreciation I 
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
This course provides the fundamental skills and a technical introduction to wine tasting beginning with the visual, olfactory, and gustatory examination. Students will learn to analyze the organoleptic components of wines, the importance and influences attributed by to territory, and finally how to distinguish as well as create excellent food and wine pairings. Lectures will be supplemented by wine tasting workshops. The objective of this class is for students to be able to recognize quality in wines from around the world and obtain a working knowledge of international wine regions and as well as the wine industry. 
 
FW WE WW 360 Wines of The World I
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
This course has been designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the main wine producing countries of the so-called “Old World” and to further develop skills as a wine taster. The countries to be studied are: France (with a special emphasis on Bordeaux, Burgundy and the Champagne), as well as Germany, Austria, Spain and Portugal. Through comparative tastings, students will be encouraged to offer a critical analysis of wines produced in different parts of the Old World, with emphasis on the relationship between sensory properties of the wines and factors associated with their place of origin.    
 
FW WE WS 335/336  Wine Service and Beverage Management
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours + 140 practicum hours)
This course will examine the figure of “the sommelier” and provide essential information about the following: stocking a cellar, storing wine, reading and composing a wine list, selecting the proper wine glasses, serving wine, decanting wine and an introduction to beverages other than wine.
Certificate students enrolled in Wine Service Beverage Management, will be able to put in to practice their skills acquired by managing the wine and beverage service at Ganzo. (GANZO is the non-profit cultural association and restaurant-club operated by Apicius students).
 
 
SEMINARS 
 
FW FS SA 300
Food Safety and Sanitation

1 semester credits (16 lecture hours)
This course introduces food production practices. Topics covered include prevention of food borne illness through proper handling of potentially hazardous foods, legal guidelines, kitchen safety, facility sanitation, safe practices of food preparation, storing, and reheating guidelines. 
 
FW CA SC 300
Local Restaurants and Wine Bars: 

Signature Chefs and Sommeliers
1 semester credit (15 lecture hours)
Industry professionals come together in a series of seminars covering their personal and professional experiences as well as offering insight and advice to participating students.
 
FW WC IW 300
Leading Italian Winemakers

1 semester credits (15 lecture hours)
This course will introduce the student to the Italian wine industry with a focuses on top producers. The historical and cultural traditions of this art will be examined in depth as well as the contemporary wine industry in the age of globalization.
 
FW FC SB 306
Coffee and After Meal Beverages

1 semester credits (15 lecture hours) 
Post-prandial beverages will be examined in their historic and cultural context in this course is also offered as a seminar. Special attention will be paid to the ingredients, preparation and service of these beverages.
 
 
FW WE WM 300    
Introduction to Winemaking

2 semester credits (30 lecture hours)
This course analyzes the fundamental principles of the grapevine culture in Italy and covers production systems, harvesting, winery organization, storage and processing of grapes. Overview and sensory evaluations of the major wines produced in Italy. Students will spend two weekends in a vineyard and wine producer during the “vendemmia” – annual grape harvest.  Fall semester only.
 
SEMESTER II – ADVANCED (SPRING)
 
Mission/Goal
The aim of the Advanced level is to deepen students’ professional understanding of wine appreciation. An overview of Italian wines by region will be provided, as well as a study of wines from other areas of the world, in order to allow students to make critical comparisons.
The program includes an introduction to wine communication and marketing and the analysis of the most common methods for food and wine pairing. 
One of the courses includes visits to six different wineries.
 
CORE COURSES
 
FW WC PF 335
Pairing Food and Wine

3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
The capacity to offer the best wine as a combination for chosen dishes is a very important task. The course includes an analysis of the "Combination Technique" used today by the Italian Association of Sommeliers, sensory and quality evaluations, practical workshops on the most successful matches as well as the creation of new flavor combinations. 
 
HP FB WC 380
Wine Communications and Marketing

3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
Business and marketing aspects of the wine industry. Students will be presented with the following topics: an introduction to communication theory, wine communication, introduction to management and marketing theory, wine marketing, economics of the world wine industry, human resource management.    
Cross-listed to Marketing, (Business).
 
FW WE WA 440
Wine Appreciation II

3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
This course has been designed to provide students with an advanced working knowledge of wine appreciation. Emphasis is placed on studying the most important Italian grape varieties through out the Italian territory and to learn how to assess and to evaluate the wine typologies deriving from different grapes and soils. Particular importance is given to comparative wine tasting, focusing on the different characteristics of wines coming from different regions. The course gives a complete overview of the most important Italian wine areas. 
Prerequisites: Wine Appreciation I or equivalent. 
 
FW WE VE 450     
Viticulture and Enology: An Educational Wine Tour II

3 semester credits (45 course hours - 45 field trip hours)
Students will be learning directly from wine procedures through a series of trips. The following types of wine will be studied: light bodied white wines, wooded and full-bodied white wines, sparkling wines, sweet table wines, light bodied red wines, medium bodied red wines, full bodied red wines, fortified wines, and oaky wines. The course will cover the chemistry and analysis of wine, the changes brought about with aging, faults in wine and the manipulation of wine. The itinerant course includes visits to: Distillerie Nardini (Veneto - Grappa), Prunotto (Piemonte - Barolo and Barbaresco), Marchesi Antinori at the Tignanello Estate (Tuscany - the first Super Tuscan), Montevertine (Tuscany - the real Sangiovese), Loacker biodynamic wines (Tuscany - Brunello Di Montalcino, Bolgheri), and Berlucchi (Lombardia - sparkling wines).    
 
FW WE WW 460
Wines of The World II

3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
This course continues the journey of world wines by focusing on the countries of the  “New World” in order to further develop students' skills as a wine taster. The countries to be studied are: Hungary, United States of America (with a special emphasis on California), Australia and South Africa, as well as New Zealand, Chile and Argentina. Students will participate in comparative tastings to be able to conduct a critical analysis of wines produced in different parts of the New World, with the usual emphasis on the relationship between sensory properties of the wines and factors associated with their place of origin. 
Prerequisite: Wines of the World I or equivalent. 
 
 
PS SP WE 500
Special Project: Practicum in the Wine Industry

2 semester credits (140 Internship hours)
Cross-listed to:  Wine Expertise (Food and Wine Studies)
Non-paid part- time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.
Practicum takes place at GANZO, the Apicius non-profit cultural association and restaurant-club.
 
SEMINARS
 
FW WC PC 340
Pairing Cocktails and Food

1 semester credit (15 hours)
In this seminar the student will learn the basics of cocktail mixology. Students will learn about a range of spirits and their compatibility with other spirits and beverages. Cocktail composition and preparation will procede the  essential rules for matching drinks and food, and how to serve mixed drinks as companions throughout the meal.
 
FW WC PB 345
Beer Brewing and Pairing

1 semester credit (15 hours)
This seminar combines lectures and tastings as students examine the origins and history of beer (and related beverages). Similarities and differences regarding brewing, taste and essential characteristics between wine and beer will be examined as well. The principles of matching beer and different kind of food will be analyzed. 
 
FW WE GL 400
Spirits and Grappa

1 semester credit (15 hours)
This seminar focuses on “spirits” with a special focus on grappa. Lectures will be complemented by in-class tastings. Focus will be on the historic origins, methods of production as well as he various types of grappa and their usage (drinking and cooking).
 
HP FB WB 540
Wine Bar Management

1 semester credits (15 lecture hours)
The course objective is to introduce students to the basics of wine and bar management. We will study the logical progression from the concept of operating a wine bar to a comprehensive picture of what the wine bar business is all about. The course will focus on wine bar financing, staff management, analysis and marketing. Students will learn strategies and tricks to effectively market and promote their business and create more customers without resorting to the traditional means of expensive and often ineffective mass media advertising. 
 
HP FB SF 300
Sustainability in the Italian Food Industry

2 semester credits (30 lecture hours)
Development of a sustainable food system is an essential part of long term economic planning. The course focuses on food processing, packaging and distribution, exploring the social aspect of the food supply chain. Sustainability principles will be analyzed as well as case studies in food and beverage service and retailing.

Price: 9,950 $  Apply Now

Master of Culinary Art


Program Objectives:
The program provides students with a sound understanding of the gastronomic culture in Italy. It polishes each student's skills and techniques enabling them to move forward in his or her professional career. To attain the specified objectives, the curriculum includes: 
- 13 courses for a total of over 800 hours including instruction and lab hours
- a practicum experience (approx 20 hours per week for a total of approx 700 hours) to provide an opportunity to put theory to practice in a professional environment. This practicum takes place at GANZO, the Apicius non-profit cultural association and restaurant-club.

Total Course credits: 35
Total Internship/Apprenticeship Credits: 8
Total Degree Requirements ‚ Credits: 43


Duration and Certification
The program is one year long and it is designed to celebrate the outstanding mastery in Italian Cuisine that has developed in Italy over the centuries. Classes are held in the mornings and in the afternoons, over a traditional semester format. The Master Program is open each year only to 12 participants. After the successful completion of the program, students will receive a Master Certificate in Italian Cuisine. The master is taught in English.  
Please note: The Master in Culinary Arts program is structured in a fall-spring semester sequence. 

Prerequisites:
Detailed CV demonstrating a Bachelor's degree in culinary arts and/or hospitality with evaluation reports or transcripts or at least 3 years of professional experience. Successful performance on both a written exam and a practical test at the start of the term demonstrating basic knowledge of the following: 
Deboning chicken, filleting a fish, various cooking methodologies (poaching, roasting, braising, stewing, sauting, broiling, frying, etc.) knife skills for various vegetable cuts, basic dressings, marinades, and sauces. A.I.S.H. Culinary Arts Advanced students needing the aforementioned technical skills may apply for Summer sessions before applying for the Master.

Program of study: 

Semester I
The aim of the first semester is to provide students with a sound knowledge of Italian cuisine. Students will be introduced to the history and evolution of Italian gastronomy, and will learn how to use high quality ingredients, according to the season, the chef’s creativity and in line with the Italian taste. Topics studied include advanced cooking techniques, service planning and organization, as well as menu development. The importance of the Mediterranean diet will be analyzed both from the nutritional point of view and through the study of culinary traditions, ingredients and regional recipes from the Mediterranean region. Special emphasis will be placed on the preparation of a variety of fresh pasta and dressings, according to the true Italian style. All students are required to take a three week course of Italian language before the start of the Master program.

Core Courses

Italian Language 

3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) 
The language course is offered in different levels according to the student’s knowledge.
All students enrolled in Certificate Programs are required to take a three week course of Italian Language before the start of the Certificate Program.

FW CA MD 515                                                                                                                                                                                          Menu Development
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
An analysis of menu development for food service establishments. Topics to be covered include: menu development, descriptions, layout, design, pricing, sales mix and station balance. Students will be involved in critiquing and creating menus from the perspective of concept, clarity, cost, price, and efficiency. 

FW CA RC 530                                                                                                                                                                                 Advanced Italian Restaurant Cooking I
3 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours- 45 hands-on hours)
The course introduces students to the preparation of modern and regional dishes in a restaurant setting and allows them to put their skills into practice in Italian restaurant settings. Emphasis will be placed on cooking techniques and ingredients used in contemporary and classical cuisine, planning and ordering for production, station organization, preparation and plating, timing, palate development and other production realities of a restaurant. Students will cover a variety of flavors and ingredient combinations in Italian restaurant cuisine while preparing them according to the learned concepts of food handling and food safety of a professional kitchen. 
        
FW CA IG 540                                                                                                                                                                                 Intro to Italian Gastronomy
3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
An introduction to the social, historical, and cultural forces that have affected the culinary, baking, and pastry professions in Italy; traditions and the way these traditions translate into the professional environment of the food service industry today. Topics include the contemporary challenges facing food professionals in the twenty-first century and etiquette as a historical, social, and professional discipline. Students will be expected to complete several written assignments. 
 
FW CA FC 680         
Italian Food and Culture

3 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 hands-on hours)
In this course, students will study the relationship between food and culture, with a focus on the cultural rules of food consumption and how they can be compared to the rules of music, dance, and poetry. Course topics include the relationships between food and religion, gender, folk traditions, mores, and life-cycle rituals. Emphasizing critical reading and writing, this course provides theoretical and empirical exposure to food research in anthropology, folklore, history, and sociology of Italy.

FW CA PW 580         
Italian Pasta Workshop

3 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 hands-on hours)
The workshop objective is to provide students with fundamental knowledge of one of the main dishes of Italian gastronomical culture. Students will appreciate how the preparation and presentation of Pasta has changed over the centuries and, through the examination of ingredients and the understanding of the evolution of cooking techniques, they will be provided with a sound understanding of the preparation of traditional Italian pasta. The course consists of lectures, workshops and tastings. Each class includes a hands-on cooking session of about 3 hours. The course also includes personal research, assignments and interviews.

FW FS SA 300 
Food Safety and Sanitation

2 semester credits (30 lecture hours)
This course introduces food production practices. Topics covered include prevention of food borne illness through proper handling of potentially hazardous foods, legal guidelines, kitchen safety, facility sanitation, safe practices of food preparation, storing, and reheating guidelines. 

PS IN CA 700
Master Apprenticeship in a Local Restaurant

4 semester credits (300 contact hours)
Non-paid, part- time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required. The internship provides the student  the opportunity to manage a fully operational professional restaurant kitchen at ‚ÄúGanzo‚Äù the non-profit cultural association and restaurant ‚Äì club operated by Apicius students.

Semester II
The aim of the second semester is to deepen the student‚Äôs awareness of Italian cooking style with a special focus on the characteristics and use of products. Students will continue the study of advanced restaurant organization and cooking techniques, and will be introduced to the specific topics of the cold kitchen and buffet preparation. 
A wider understanding of Italian culture will be provided through the analysis of the cultural rules of food consumption, the relationships between food and religion, feasts, traditions and lifestyle, and a focus on the new perspectives of Italian regional cuisines.
Food production practices, as well as food safety and kitchen sanitation will be studied, in order to provide students with a deep knowledge of legal guidelines for culinary professionals. The study of personal and small group communication and of forces that influence group behavior will give students the skills required to communicate effectively in work situations. Students will finally have the possibility to put into practice what they have learned in class through the Internship session.

Core Courses

FW DN DS 520     
Dietetics and Nutrition in the Mediterranean

3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
This course introduces students to the benefits of eating the “Mediterranean way”, focusing on the nutritional aspects of the diet, the culinary tradition of the most significant Mediterranean countries and on the cultural relevance of the Mediterranean way of eating. Scientists and researchers have discovered that traditional Mediterranean cuisine is one of the most healthful, nutritious diets in the world, one that can help you live longer and enjoy far lower rates of coronary heart disease and other chronic conditions, including diabetes and cancer.

FW CA MC 550         
Mediterranean Cuisine and Ingredients

3 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours- 45 hands-on hours)
Prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate traditional, regional dishes of Europe and the Mediterranean. Emphasis will be placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparations, and techniques representative of the cuisines of Spain, Portugal, France, Italy, Morocco, Tunisia, Greece, and Egypt.

FW CA RC 630 
Advanced Italian Restaurant Cooking II

3 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 hands-on hours)
The course provides a deeper insight to the preparation of modern and regional dishes in a restaurant setting and allows students to put their skills into practice in Italian restaurant settings. In addition to the concepts of kitchen organization and production, the foundations of Italian restaurant cuisine, and restaurant management, this course will also demonstrate the use of management skills training in the food service industry, the history of food and food service, and propose more complicated restaurant dish preparations during lab hours. Other topics covered include basic responsibility for food service personnel, management and HR practices, restaurant esthetics, and current/future trends in the restaurant industry. 
Prerequisites: Advanced Italian Restaurant Cooking I or equivalent. 

FW CA GM 660         
Garde Manger

3 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 hands-on hours)
An introduction to three main areas of the cold kitchen: reception foods, plated appetizers, and buffet arrangements. Students will learn to prepare canapes, hot and cold hors d'oeuvre, appetizers, forcemeats, pates, galantines, terrines, salads, and sausages. Curing and smoking techniques for meat, seafood, and poultry items will be practiced, along with contemporary styles of presenting food and the preparation of buffets.

FW CA PK 670         
Italian Product Knowledge

3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)
An introduction to the identification and use of vegetables, fruits, herbs, nuts, grains, dry goods, prepared goods, dairy products, and spices in various forms. Explore both fresh and prepared foods and learn to identify, receive, store, and hold products. Students will also learn to evaluate products for taste, texture, smell, appearance, and other quality attributes.     


PS IN CA 701
Master Apprenticeship in a Local Restaurant*

4 semester credits (300 contact hours)
Non-paid, part- time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required. The internship provides the student  the opportunity to manage a fully operational professional restaurant kitchen at ‚"Ganzo" the non-profit cultural association and restaurant operated by Apicius students.

Price: 15,000 $  Apply Now

TuttoToscana 2019, Special Event Management Program in Florence Italy and NYC


Program Overview

The TuttoToscana Study Away program is a flexible model for international study opportunities in Florence and NYC in the fall season. Students may select Florence Session II 3-week courses that feature a course project geared towards the preparation of FUA TuttoToscana events and activities in NYC scheduled during the Intersession Week III. After the 3-week session, students may continue with a fourth study away week in NYC featuring events at the James Beard Foundation. Coursework in both Florence and NYC features 3 different areas of involvement and allows students to take on the challenge of bridging two cosmopolitan cities through hospitality, the visual arts, and food management with the objective of bringing Tuscan culture to NYC.

Program Structure

Students may choose from 3 different areas of event organization and production for 6-9 credits (Florence-NYC) or 3 credits (NYC-only). The 6 to 9-credit option follows a 4-week structure that begins with 3 weeks of academic and event preparation in Florence and concludes with the event cycle week in NYC. The 3-credit option follows a 1-week structure held directly in NYC. The event concept and details are managed and organized by students and faculty after a deep cultural and academic immersion in Florence, and executed as a team during the week of event staging on location.

 

Area 1: Event Planning & Communications (3*-6-9 credits)
Area 2: Art Direction: Visual Arts, Digital Media, and Art History (3*-6-9 credits)
Area 3: Food Management and Production for Special Events (3*-6-9 credits)


*3-credit options are held directly in NYC as a 1-week session.

 

FALL 2019 Dates:

Sunday Sept 29 Students arrive in Florence
Monday Sept 30 Orientation/Final Registration
Tuesday Oct 1 Florence classes start
Thursday Oct 17 Florence classes end
Friday Oct 18 Florence housing check-out (by 10AM)
Saturday Oct 19 - Saturday Oct 26 Study away program in NYC
 
Friday Nov 1 Final papers due
November 6-7-8 Online oral presentations of papers
 
SPRING 2020 Dates:
 
Sunday March 1 Students arrive in Florence
Monday March 2 Orientation/Final Registration
Tuesday March 3 Florence classes start
Thursday March 19 Florence classes end
Friday March 20 Florence housing check-out (by 10AM)
Saturday March 21 - Saturday March 28 Study away program in NYC
 
Friday Apr 3 Final papers due
Apr 8-9-10 Online oral presentations of papers

 

Event Locations

Events take place each year at the James Beard Foundation. Other locations have included the Astor Center and Macy's at Herald Square. Typically an average of 4 total events are planned and produced by FUA students and faculty for the New York public.

Students may choose from 3 different areas of event organization and production:

1.Event Planning & Communications

• Planning event logistics, managing communications between Palazzi and the various entities involved in the events including locations and the media.

• Coordinating and managing internal project production and communications between team members.

• Specialize in international and cross-cultural communications for events involving more than one country.

2.Visual Arts, Digiat Media and Art History

• Creating and producing all materials related to the event concept and image.

• Manage production projects involving specific skills in videography, photography, video making.

• Preparing, revising and editing graphic layouts for print and online publication.

• Deepen knowledge and visual approaches to specifically targeted events and event concepts.

3.Food Management and Producation for Special Events

• Successfully coordinate Italian menu and wine list development.

• Manage food & wine logistics from abroad for the New York events.

• Directly communicate with wine producers.

• Create meaningful wine profiles and presentations for the American public

• Develop strategies for presenting Italian wines in international settings and impart the pproach to the Wine Service Team.

 

Program cost for one areas ( chosen from 1, 2 or 3) is $ 3,675 USD ( 3 weeks, 6 credits)

Includes: lab contribution, Internet access in school facilities in Florence, Apicius Uniform (area 3 only), HTH insurance, coursework in Florence and New York, paperwork for service learning activities, group gala dinner as a guest at the JBF.

Does not include: meals, airfares. Noteaccommodation in shared apartment in Florence (multiple occupancy room) is avilable upon request for $850 for 3 weeks

Program cost for 1 week NYC events is $ 1,750 ( 1 weeks, 3 credits)

Does not include: meals, airfares, accommodation in New York

 

Price: 3,675 $  Apply Now

Academic Summer 2019 Programs


 

ACADEMIC SUMMER 2019 DATES

3 week sessions – classes are held Monday through Friday

3 Credits - $ 4,250

6 Credits - $ 6,050

SUMMER I 2019

Sunday, May 14 - Students arrive (after 4:00PM) 
Monday, May 15 - Orientation/Final Registration 
Tuesday, May 16 - Classes start
Thursday, June 1 - Classes end
Friday, June 2 - Housing check out (by 10AM)
 
SUMMER II 2019
 
Sunday, June 4 - Students arrive (after 4:00PM) 
Monday, June 5 - Orientation/Final Registration
Tuesday, June 6 - Classes start
Thursday, June 22 - Classes end
Friday, June 23 - Housing check out (by 10AM)
 
SUMMER III 2019
 
Sunday, June 25 - Students arrive (after 4:00PM) 
Monday, June 26 - Orientation/Final Registration
Tuesday, June 27 - Classes start
Thursday, July 13 - Classes end
Friday, July 14 - Housing check out (by 10AM)
 
SUMMER IV 2019
 
Sunday, July 16 - Students arrive (after 4:00PM) 
Monday, July 17 - Orientation/Final Registration
Tuesday, July 18 - Classes start
Thursday, August 3 - Classes end
Friday, August 4 - Housing check out (by 10AM)

 

6 week sessions - Classes are held MON, TUE,WED & THU

3 Credits - $ 5,150

6 Credits - $ 6,550

9 Credits - $ 8,050 


PLEASE NOTE: Students can also select classes from 3-week schedule (Monday
through Friday)

SUMMER A 2019

Sunday, May 14 - Students arrive/Final Registration
Monday, May 15 - Orientation 
Tuesday, May 16 - TUE, WED & THU Classes start
Thursday, June 22 - Classes end
Friday, June 23 - Housing check out (by 10AM)
 
SUMMER B 2019
 
Sunday, June 25 - Students arrive (after 4:00PM)
Monday, June 26 - Orientation 
Tuesday, June 27 - TUE, WED & THU Classes start
Thursday, August 3 - Classes end
Friday, August 5 - Housing check out (by 10AM)

 

Price: 4,250 $  Apply Now

9 Week Graduate Hospitality Apparenticeship in the Restaurant Industry


 

Program Details
The Summer Post Graduate Apprenticeship program prepares students for supervisory
and management positions in the world's largest and fastest growing industry.
The Florence experience is a unique opportunity that is open only to a limited number
of students who already possess a professional and advanced educational training
in the culinary field.
 
Courses emphasize practical and management skills through a combination of theoretical
classes, experiential learning, practical labs and field studies led by professors
with extensive industry experience. The overall program is divided into 4
concentrations focusing on Food & Beverage Service, Food Preparation, Culinary
Management, and Special Event Management & Catering. All classes and labs will
take place at “GANZO” the non-profit cultural association and restaurant-club operated
by Apicius students.
 
Please see below for further information on admissions and courses. Detailed information
on admissions, course descriptions, and program duration are located in the
Application Form and Course Catalogue.
 
Starting Dates:
 
Arrival Sunday May 12
Orientation Monday May 13
Classes start Tuesday May 14
Classes End Friday July 12
Checkout Saturday July 13
 
OR
 
Arrival Sunday June 2
Orientation Monday June 3
Classes start Tuesday June 4
Classes End Friday August 2
Checkout Saturday August 3
 
 
Program includes:
 
Credit load
12 total credits
Tuition for one Concentration + Housing
$ 7,550
 
Classes held
Monday through Friday. Apprenticesip hours are also held on weekends.
 
Admission Requirements
- Students who have successfully completed the Apicius Master in Italian Cuisine or
the 2-year associate certificate in Culinary Arts or Hospitality are automatically accepted
- Applicants from other institutions who have not completed the above requirements
must meet the following requirement:
Bachelor’s Degree in Hospitality Management OR must have been employed in a
commercial or institutional kitchen for at least one year prior to the commencement
of the program.
 
CONCENTRATION 1: FOOD & BEVERAGE SERVICE MANAGEMENT
DINING ROOM SERVICE MANAGEMENT & OPERATIONS BL HP DR 591
6 semester credits (30 lecture hours - 300 hours field apprenticeship)
At the end of this course students will be able to manage the operation of a full-service dining room and front
of the house procedures practiced at “GANZO” the non-profit cultural association and restaurant-club operated
by Apicius students. All the various front of the house positions and the theory and techniques of customer
service will be analyzed, practiced and evaluated. The course includes styles of service for different types of
restaurants. Students will concentrate on dining room service, table set-ups, point-of-sale system and will focus
on the operation of a full-service restaurant.
 
FOOD AND WINE PAIRING & WINE SERVICE FW WE FW 461
6 semester credits (30 lecture hours - 300 hours field apprenticeship)
Students will perform and operate firsthand Wine and Food Pairing along with Wine Service at “GANZO” the
non-profit cultural association and restaurant-club operated by Apicius students. Tasks will range from tasting,
serving, interpreting labels, wine terminology, and storage. Wine lists will be prepared under the supervision of
a faculty member. In addition, the student will cover the principles of correct restaurant style food and wine
pairing along with professional wine service and wine service management.
 
CONCENTRATION 2: FOOD PREPARATION
ITALIAN Á LA CARTE CUISINE FW CA LC 683
6 semester credits (30 lecture hours - 300 hours field apprenticeship)
The course provides the student with the opportunity to work in a fully operating professional restaurant kitchen
at “GANZO” the non-profit cultural association and restaurant-club operated by Apicius students. The student
will experience classical and contemporary methods of cooking and presentation styles used in the Italian a la
carte restaurant production. Students will also have the opportunity to create and design special menus under
the supervision of the chef instructors.
 
ITALIAN STYLE RESTAURANT PREPARATION TECHNIQUES FW CA IS 684
6 semester credits (30 lecture hours - 300 hours field apprenticeship)
This course will provide the students with the advanced theoretical knowledge of meat, fish, and shellfish utilization as it relates to the foodservice kitchen. Emphasis will be on identification of species, carcasses, bone
and muscle structure, primal, sub-primal and fabricated cuts used in the food and restaurant industries. The various types of fish and shellfish will be explored including factors that indicate freshness, market forms and preparation methods. Students will work on lunch menu ideas for “GANZO” the non-profit cultural association and
restaurant-club operated by Apicius students, compare with local restaurants, base and define menus on seasonality and fresh food market availability. The apprenticeship strongest component is the daily challenge that
students will encounter in working with seasonal ingredients and menu improvisation.
 
CONCENTRATION 3: CULINARY MANAGEMENT
RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT TRAINEESHIP BL HP DR 592
6 semester credits (30 lecture hours - 300 hours field apprenticeship)
This important component of the Culinary Management program will provide the student with hands-on practical
exposure to the culinary industry. It consists of a ten-week training placement at “GANZO” the non-profit
cultural association and restaurant-club operated by Apicius students and is based on a 30-hour training week.
Students will have an opportunity to observe and learn from experienced personnel in a real-life work environment
while integrating a competency-based work template as a framework for learning.
 
SUCCESSFUL CULINARY MANAGEMENT BL HP CM 593
6 semester credits (30 lecture hours- 300 hours field apprenticeship)
This course consists of the cost and control management practices applied in the food service sector. Included
topics of the theory and principles of the course cover accounting, cost control, food & beverage operations
and purchasing, inventory & assets, budgets, the break-even point calculation for sales projection, and labor
and wages. The practical section of this course provides the opportunity for students to put into practice the
learned concepts and develop them into competent skills in a real-life restaurant situation. Students will work
with industry software programs and computer applications as well as manual forms in order to oversee the
management practices at “GANZO” the non-profit cultural association and restaurant-club operated by Apicius
students.
 
CONCENTRATION 4: SPECIAL EVENT MANAGEMENT & CATERING
THE ITALIAN CHEF'S TABLE FW CA CT 689
6 semester credits (30 lecture hours- 300 hours field apprenticeship)
This partially self-directed course is designed to provide the culinary student with the opportunity to design, organize, implement, serve and evaluate a special dinner event, which will take place at the “GANZO” restaurant-
club at the end of the 10-week apprenticeship. Emphasis will be placed upon the training of the student
towards effective production management, market-related menu planning, mise en place, a la carte cooking
and service techniques in the context of a special event. Customer needs, case studies and weekly events will
allow students to experience the balance that exists between dreams, ideas and customer satisfaction.
 
SPECIAL EVENT PLANNING AND CATERING MANAGEMENT BL HP EP 594
6 semester credits (30 lecture hours - 300 hours field apprenticeship)
The special event field is an industry sector encompassing many interrelated activities such as marketing, promotion, entertainment, food and beverage planning. The range of events may be from a one-day recreation
tournament, gala awards presentation, lifecycle events, art exhibitions, and special aperitivo events. Students
will be planning events for the special section of the “GANZO” restaurant-club that comprises special events
during weekends upon reservation. The quality of the experience, the final portfolio and the faculty supervision
will guarantee a unique educational experience which will open the doors to a professional career in the food
industry.

 

Price: 7,550 $  Apply Now

Housing & Student Life


 

Shared Student Apartments

All students are accommodated in a private apartments in the city center in a walking distance from the school. All apartments are fully equipped with furniture and kitchen utensils, where students can practice to cook and create their own recipe. Most of the bedrooms are double-occupancy rooms, a few are single-occupancy rooms. Kitchen and bathroom are usually to be shared with other students

Housing Fee (includes utilities and final cleaning)

 

Semester Fall/Spring

            Double Room                                                                                                               $ 3,750

            Single Room supplement fee (limited availability)                                                $ 1,000           

                                

Summer Session Fee for 3 Week/ 6 Weeks

            Double Room                                                                                                             Included

            Single Room supplement fee (limited availability)                                      $ 350/ $ 700

 

Gallery


Traditional Student apartment with full kitchen.Student accommodation

Travel Documents


 

PASSPORTS

All locations for our programs require that students have a passport. To obtain a passport for the first time, you need to go in person to one of 7,000 passport acceptance facilities located throughout the United States with two photographs of yourself, proof of U.S. citizenship, and a valid form of photo identification such as a driver's license.

 

VISAS

While each country has its own specific requirements, issuance of a student visa generally requires verification of enrollment in a foreign institution of learning, a financial statement guaranteeing the student will have access to adequate funds during their stay, and other forms or documents required by the consulate.

In accordance with Italian law all students studying in Italy for MORE than 90 days are required to obtain a student visa. It is no longer necessary for US students studying for LESS than 90 days to obtain a visa. Our office will guide students through this process and direct them to the appropriate consular office. However, it is the responsibility of each individual student to obtain necessary visas. 

Obtaining a student visa may be a timely process therefore the application should be started as early as possible. Upon acceptance into the programs, each student should immediately print the Student Visa Application Guidelines and the Consulate Visa Application. Study Abroad Europe cannot intervene for students who do not acquire appropriate passports or visas

Non US Citizens and students not residing in the US should contact their nearest Italian Consulate and follow their directions for obtaining a student visa. Students may request the necessary documents from our office.

For visa information relating to your specific study abroad location, please refer to the required readings in your Study Abroad Europe account (you must have started an application)

OTHER INFORMATION

Getting the proper documents for travelling abroad is essential. Below are links from the US State Department website:

 

Semester Program


 

Application Fee $ 95
Security Deposit (refundable at the end of the term) $ 300
CERTIFICATE PROGRAM COSTS
One Semester: Italian language + pre-set block of courses                $   9,950
One Year Program: Two Semesters of pre-set block of courses  $ 14,750
FREE ELECTIVE PROGRAM COSTS
One Semester: Italian language + any 3 or 4 courses from schedule $ 10,400
One Year Program: Two Semesters 5 courses each from schedule    $ 19,000

 

 

Upon completion of the program, Study Abroad Europe will arrange your official transcript/certificate to be send to your home university. 

Program Deadlines 

SAI is still accepting applications for the Spring 2012

Fall/Year Long Program  - June 10

Spring - November 15

Optional/Additional Costs

  • Late payment fee (if any payment is late): $150
  • Single room supplement: $1,000
  • Excursions: $300- $500 

 

     

Summer 2019 Program


 

TUITION COSTS + HOUSING
Application Fee $95
Security Deposit (refundable at the end of the term) $300
3 Week Summer Programs (Summer I, II, III & IV)  
3 Credits $4,250
6 Credits $6,050
6 Week Summer Programs (Summer A & B)  
3 Credits $5,150
6 Credits $6,550
9 Credits $8,050
Cultural Introduction to Italy – Optional  
Cultural Introduction to Italy – Tuscany* $1,550
*This can be added to the beginning of either the 3 week sessions or 6 week sessions

 

Program Deadlines

Summer I - April 1st

Summer II - April 15th

Summer III - May 1st

Summer IV - May 15th

Summer A - April 1st

Summer B May 1st

Optional/Additional Costs 

  • Late payment fee (if any payment is late): $145
  • Excursions: $300- $500
  • Single Room Supplement: 3 Weeks/$350; 6 Weeks/$650 

Photo Gallery


Gallery


Apicius International School of hospitality, main dinning room overlooking the student kitchenApicius students attending Italian Baking and Pastry ClassApicius students attending Culinary Art ClassApicius Students preparing for cooking classHospitality Management students dinning roomRestaurant Management class

Questions & Answers


 

How do I apply to a program?

You can click on the red “Online Application” button on the upper right corner and start your application. If you would prefer to have Study Abroad Europe mail you an application package, please e-mail or call us to request a packet.

How many students will be at my study abroad course?

Study Abroad Europe school partners are creating true cultural immersion and offer personalized study programs. The number of students in a class varies from campus to campus; usually it is between 10 and 15 students per class.

Can I participate in a program if I have already graduated/am a graduate student?

Yes. We offer graduated management apprenticeship. Please contact the appropriate program manager to see if acceptance is possible. There will most likely be additional requirements for the application process.

My GPA does not meet the minimum requirement. Can I still apply?

 Exceptions may be made to the GPA requirements. An academic letter of recommendation and a statement of intent will be required of any student who does not meet the GPA requirement for most programs. Please contact the appropriate program manager for details. Please note that submitting these items does not guarantee admission to the program.

It is after the application deadline. Can I still apply?
We  may be able to accept applications after the application deadline. Please contact the appropriate program manager to see if this is possible. A $145 late fee will apply.

When are payments due?
Once you have been accepted to a program, a $500 non-refundable deposit is due within 2 weeks of your acceptance. This deposit is applied to the total program cost, and is necessary in order to secure your spot in the program. Additional payments and deposit deadlines will be outlined in your acceptance packet and program invoice. All funds must be received prior to your departure for the program abroad.

Can I use my financial aid to pay for my program?

Study Abroad Europe accepts most forms of financial aid as payment; however, Athena cannot issue or process financial aid. You must work with your home university's Financial Aid & Study Abroad Offices to coordinate the use of your financial aid award money.

How do I know if my university will allow me to use my financial aid?
You will need to speak with the study abroad office and/or financial aid office at your home institution for help in determining if your financial aid can be used.

If I withdraw, what kind of refund will I receive?
Please refer to the "Cancellation Policy" located on the program Application.

What type of transcript will I receive for my coursework abroad?

Included in the price of all programs is a transcript for your coursework abroad. For most programs, this transcript is one from the overseas university (included in the cost of the program).
For students whose home institutions will not accept credits reported on an overseas transcript, Study Abroad Europe can arrange for study abroad credits to be reported on a U.S. accredited transcript (for most programs this incurs an additional cost). Study Abroad Europe is proud to offer both options in order to ensure that all students will have an option that will allow for successful credit transfer to their home university. Please talk to a representative to ensure you receive the type of transcripts you need.

Do I need a passport?

All citizens of the United States are required to have a valid U.S. passport in order to enter a foreign country and to re-enter the U.S. Many countries also require that your passport be valid at least three months beyond the anticipated dates of your trip. You will also need a valid passport in order to obtain your visa, so it is important to apply for your passport early.

What is a visa?

A visa is a document that allows entry into and travel within a country, and is authorized by the government of your destination country. Please note that a visa does not take the place of a passport, but is needed in addition to a passport for most study abroad programs.

Do I need a visa?

Most programs require a visa to study abroad. You will receive detailed instructions in your acceptance packet outlining the requirements and procedures for obtaining your visa document.

Are courses offered in English, or do I need to know the language of the country abroad?

All programs offer courses in English. Some programs require students to enroll in one language course in order to facilitate a more authentic cultural immersion while taking English language electives. Full language immersion programs are available for students who have interest in gaining fluency while abroad.

I have more questions. How can I contact a representative?

There are many ways to reach a representative.
E-mail: info@studyabroadineurope.com
Phone:  718 710 0498
Times: Monday through Friday from 10AM - 5PM EST  


 

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